We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

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We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

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Change power company, support green energy sources and get electricity overview with Watts

Which power company should I choose and who is betting on sustainable energy and providing the greatest electricity overview? Read along and get the answer

A wind turbine is one of the sustainable and renewable energies that Watts uses

A lot has happened in the Danish energy market over the past 20 years.  Major changes in energy production conditions and significant changes in the supply of Danish electricity companies have meant that Danish electricity customers today face far more alternatives than in the past. Choosing an electricity company, thinking about more sustainable energy sources and newer and more innovative ways to access your electricity consumption are just some of the things that the modern Danish electricity consumer of today can decide on. The Danish electricity market has become more customized, and it has thus also become a place where the Danish consumer can have more co-determination than in the past in its impact on the environment as well as its wallet.

Through an active position, Danish electricity consumers today are free to choose their own electricity company and choose how much insight they want in their consumption. New innovative initiatives have shifted the decisions to the individual consumer, and it is therefore now up to the Danish electricity consumer to decide for himself how much responsibility they want to take for the environment and the economy in connection with the choice of electricity company.

Free choice of electricity company since 2003

Not everyone is aware of this. However, the Danish electricity market was liberalised in 2003 and has since then been free of consumers. Previously, danish citizens had no participation in the choice of electricity company, since the electricity company was then given in advance via one's residence. However, the electricity reform in 1999 started to slow the opening up of the electricity market, culminating in a planned total liberalisation from January 2003. From here, the Danish electricity customers would no longer be geographically tied to a local electricity company.

Despite 18 years of free choice of power company, however, there are still a number of Danes who do not take an active position on their choice of power company. Perhaps this is due to a continuing lack of awareness of the great participation, or it may be rooted in the exact opposite: that one has ample insight into the Danish electricity market, and perhaps almost feels taken aback by the many supply of electricity companies that the market is now bidding for.

How cheap are the cheapest power companies?

For the vast majority of Danes who have a moderate insight into the Danish electricity market, the choice of electricity provider has mainly been about one thing: economy. The various Danish electricity providers have struggled to promote themselves as the best power company on the market, and for many of the Danish customers, the best power company has also been synonymous with the cheapest power company. Over the years, several different electricity price comparison sites have also been created online, where you have been able to see who, for example, was the cheapest power company in 2018 or the cheapest power company in 2019. But is it a failed or simplistic way of looking at the many Danish electricity companies today? Because to what extent is there scope for financial savings by switching power companies and are there other and more relevant elements to consider?

The savings are limited to 18% of your electricity bill

For many people, it can be quite a plausible reason to want to change power companies in the effort to find a cheap power company. However, many consumers may go in search of the cheapest power company in the belief that the electricity companies on the Danish market can compete on the entire electricity bill. However, this is by no means the case. Competition in the electricity market limits to a small corner of your electricity bill, which is only about 18%[i]. The other 82% of your electricity bill will be the same regardless of the choice of electricity company, since this part consists of flat-rate taxes and taxes that are independent of the electricity companies concerned.

The last 18% of the bill relates to kWh price and subscription, and it is here that the Danish electricity companies must engage in competition between themselves on price. It is, of course, possible to point to Denmark's cheapest electricity company in this connection, but the difference between the price of the different suppliers will be minimal, because it is precisely naturally limited by the special circumstances of the electricity bill. Also read more about what one kWh costs and how far one kWh goes.

 

A green choice with Denmark's renewable energy sources

For some consumers, however, the small savings in electricity bills are not the main driver of electricity company choice. More and more Danes are looking to greener energy companies, which are in line with the demands of the time for phasing out the CO2-emitting fossil fuels. These electricity companies try to optimise the supply of electricity from renewable energy sources in Denmark by making use of wind energy, solar energy and biomass.

Denmark's energy consumption by renewable energy sources

Since the 1970s, we in Denmark have installed wind turbines and offshore wind turbines for the extraction of sustainable energy. Today, there are over 6000 wind turbines at sea and on land, which are constantly being refined and further developed to optimise green energy production. In addition, sustainable biomass supplies the source of much of the Danish heat, and today accounts for about 63% of Danish renewable energy production (electricity, water and heat). Solar energy, and wind energy in particular, accounts for the remaining 37% of total energy from renewable energy sources. Overall, energy from renewable energy sources accounts for approximately 34% of total Danish energy consumption in Denmark[ii].

If you look completely isolated at the electricity area itself, today we are very well on our way in the green transition in Denmark. Today, 80% of the Danish power comes from renewable energy sources, of which 4% is from solar energy[iii],approximately 47% is from the Danish wind turbines, while the remaining renewable power is generated from biomass.

The green transition is thus well under way, and with the free choice of electricity company, any consumer can now also opt in to greener electricity companies for a more sustainable future.

However, in addition to the obvious climate-conscious electricity companies in Denmark, there is also an opportunity for electricity companies to go a step further in the fight for co2-neutral energy sources and the equalization of carbon footprints in general.

Proactive green power companies with extra climate-conscious measures

The Danish electricity customers not only have the opportunity to opt in to electricity companies with a green profile that emphasizes energy from sustainable and alternative energy sources, they can also handpick specially dedicated power companies that make an extra effort for the climate. Here, the customer will not only get an electricity company that makes an effort to supply as much electricity as possible from the renewable energy sources in Denmark, it will also have an electricity company that strives to make its electricity customers carbon neutral. There are several tangible ways in which this is to be seen, but above all an action is causing a positive stir.

Afforestation to help with CO2 absorption

Some of the additional climate measures taken by some green power companies are the planting of trees and forests. This happens, among other things, at the power company Watts, where a peace forest of 60,000 m2 is planted in connection with the members' electricity consumption. Each electricity customer at Watts plants trees through its consumption, thus offsetting its carbon footprint due to the long-term CO2 absorption from the planted trees. The more people who choose to switch power companies to Watts, the more trees are physically planted on Danish soil.

When a forest is fully planted, new land is created, where you continue planting another forest. And so it continues with carbon footprint mbalancing measures until Denmark hopefully stands in a place where the green transition is total.

Your electricity consumption is 100% certified green power

Denmark's energy sources are still not 100% renewable. There's still some way to go. However, the Danish current has already taken a seven-mile step, since 80% here is made up of energy created by wind, solar and biomass. However, 20% of Denmark's energy sources in electricity are still created from non-renewable energy sources such as oil and coal. This is mixed together with the green energy in the Danish electricity grid, which is why no one can be guaranteed 100% renewable energy when charging smartphones, streaming TV series on the flat screen or baking buns in the oven. A switch to a green electricity company will nevertheless guarantee that your electricity consumption is of 100% renewable energy. But how does this relate?

In Denmark, a leaf scheme has been set up for electricity suppliers, which has been created to ensure that the certified leaf scheme company in question can guarantee a 100% renewable energy consumption for customers. 1 or 2 blades can be allocated in the scheme, but both certifications ensure that the electricity company can prove that the overall power consumption is 100% green. This is done by the electricity company in question buying up electricity from renewable energy sources elsewhere in order to offset its customers' carbon footprint. So even if your green power company in the leaf scheme cannot guarantee that the power in your Danish outlet is 100% CO2-free, this is compensated by the purchase of green certificates that match the consumption in question.

It is thus not only possible to switch to an electricity company that announces a green and climate-conscious line, you can even choose an electricity company in the Danish magazine scheme that ensures that your carbon footprint is constantly offset.

Use our app for electricity consumption to continuously see your electricity consumption.

Choice of power companies with innovative technology for electricity overview and saving

It is possible to make a switch to electricity companies, which not only ensure co2-free electricity consumption, but which also actively create continuous technological advances for the benefit of the environment and economy. This is done mainly through a confumation of electricity consumption and innovative technology that manages to link customer consumption data in a new and intelligent way.

App-by-app overview for increased transparency

One of the largest Achilles tendons at the Danish electricity companies has been the lack of technical resources, which has had to provide customers with sufficient transparency in their electricity consumption. The public company Energinet, which operates under the Ministry of Climate Energy and Utilities, has otherwise potentially been able to create an electricity overview through its huge data hub[iv]. Here, billions of information about the Danish citizens' electricity consumption is collected by the respective electricity companies on the market, which in theory could be transformed into intelligent data for the benefit of consumers.

However, theory has finally become a practice today, as some electricity companies have now managed to collect this data intelligently. In doing so, Watts has bridged the data collected by creating an intuitive app in the form of an energy assistant that can show its members when on the day, which is the most energy from renewable energy sources and when on the day you connect to low price zones.

Instant insights and electric overview with Watts live map

As the first power company in Denmark, Watts will shortly present a technologically refined and optimized version of your electricity overview. With a physical map that can be inserted into your electricity meter at home, your Watts app will not only give you a static insight into your electricity consumption, it can now also make instant readings of your current power consumption in real time. It provides unprecedented transparency and detail in your electricity overview and creates fertile ground for immediate changes in your electricity consumption for the benefit of both the climate and your budget.

You no longer have to settle for retrospectively making retrospective changes based on outdated data where the 'damage' has already been done. With Watt's live map login, you get a unique real-time electricity overview that allows you to control your electricity consumption more than before. Here you can be written upif you want to hear more.

Which power company should I choose and is it easy to switch?

At some energy companies, a telephone call, an email or an announcement via website or app is sufficient when you want to change energy companies. As a tenant, you are also often free to choose your own energy company, unless something specific has been agreed in advance in the lease.

There is usually a binding period in an electricity company, so you must of course clarify whether you are out of that period. In the day of termination, it is often normal to have one month's notice.

Since the liberalisation of the Danish electricity market in 2003, it has not only become more manageable to change energy companies, but it has become just as easier to find an energy company that matches one's requirements for sustainable energy and up-to-date digital ease of use. An active choice of energy company that works proactively for a greener future with ever-increasing sustainable energy measures.

[i] bolius.dk/saadan-skifter-du-elselskab-18535

[ii] kefm.dk/energi-og-raastoffer/energiforsyning/vedvarende-energi

[iii] danskenergi.dk/nyheder/rekordaar-stroemmen-har-aldrig-vaeret-groennere

[iv] energinet.dk/El/DataHub

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Help the world's forests through your electricity consumption

How has human energy consumption affected the earth's climate, and how can my electricity consumption help help the world's forests?

Trees that make up some of the world's forests. Learn more about how you can contribute to the climate with Watts.

Help the world's forests through your electricity consumption

Human extraction of energy through fossil fuels and fuels has drawn major shifts in the climate. Hundreds of years of inappropriate energy production have left the world at a crossroads calling for the immediate transition to energy extraction through renewable energy sources. Hundreds of years of massive CO2 emissions must be remedied and new ideas for renewable energy production are in mind, so that our electricity consumption and other energy consumption are no longer a global burden on the climate.

In the process towards a green transition figures several important factors. Including, among other things: the world's forests and my electricity consumption. But how do the two things relate? What is their common historical context and how can my electricity consumption be transformed from a sinner in global climate accounting to becoming an active player for a greener future with increased climate balance?

Also read about our price of electricity and power at Watts, or download our app to check your electricity consumption.

Black energy has corroded resources and increased the imbalance

Energy production and energy consumption have played a crucial role in the current climate crisis throughout history. Since industrialisation in the 18th century and over the centuries, we have extracted energy from an unsustainable basis in the form of fossil fuels and fuels such as coal and oil. We have corroded the earth's resources inappropriately, with little thought of how much natural storage the earth has been able to provide. Energy extracted from fossil fuels, also called black energy, has been an effective source of energy production and at that time has appeared to be an inexhaustible source of energy consumption in the then explosive development of emerging industrial societies.

Today we have a completely different insight and understanding of the earth's resources and the global climate accounts. Because, in addition to realising that the previously extensive resources are not at all so extensive again, we have learned that the very by-product of the very same energy production has also had its consequences. And they are the ones we are facing today. The huge CO2 emissions from energy production have increased the greenhouse effect, and the earth now more than ever has a harder time getting rid of its heat. A direct consequence of humanity's long-standing use of black energy.

Felling the world's largest forests has made matters worse

CO2 is inextricably linked to the earth's ecosystem. It is a crucial source of life for plants flowers and trees that use the greenhouse gas for its growth, along with the sun's energy and water from the ground. As part of the ecosystem's cycle, plants and trees convert the absorbed CO2 into oxygen, which is then sent back into the ecosystem, thereby providing life-giving oxygen to animals and humans. Without CO2, no plants and trees, and without oxygen, no humans and animals. Everything is inextricably linked and grounded in deep dependence on each other. But if the world's life-giving forests, plants and flowers make sure to convert our CO2 into oxygen in a completely natural and constant process, what is the problem of the increased greenhouse effect?

Read about the sustainable and green forms of energy at Watts.

No chain is stronger than the weakest link

Earth's ecosystem is a rigorous biological accounting consisting of the right amount of components that together form a sustainable orbit. Small or large shifts in one or more of these components cause disturbances in natural processes and create an increased imbalance over time. With the use of black energy, we have corroded the earth's resources and increased CO2, but in the same breath we have made greater inroads into forests and plants.

Over the last 5,000 years, the land has lost over 1.8 billion hectares of the world's forests, and to this day we cut down the equivalent of 3 times Denmark's size of forest area each year . It is mainly the need for the conversion of forest areas into agriculture that has been the cause of felling the world's life-giving forest. Today, the world's forests cover 30% of the earth's land area and are easily the most effective natural remedy for absorbing the earth's CO2.
It is therefore not for nothing that the forests of the planet are often referred to as the lung of the earth, since the job of the world's forests is to respire for the well-being of the planet.
Man has not only increased the carbon footprint over time, but has also removed part of the natural component, which ensures that the carbon footprint is kept down and allows the earth to actually "breathe".

Today, fortunately, there is an increased awareness of the importance of increased forest worship and forest conservation on a global scale and at home in the form of, for example, organizations such as the Danish Forest Association, Growing Trees and The World's Forests in Copenhagen.

Green energy must relieve the world's forests and rebalance

The modern world has long recognised that the old path to energy is not a viable solution for the future. Human reaction must be taken and several levels responded to. Today, modern wind turbine technology and solar panels have taken over large parts of energy production all over the world and especially with Denmark as a pioneer. With increasingly innovative technology, we are now slowly returning to a more sustainable extraction of energy from the earth's renewable energy sources. Sun and wind are CO2-free, literally giving an increased breathing space to the world's forests and plants in the photosynthesis process of absorbing and storing the earth's greenhouse gases.
We still burn wood – but with care and sustainability

In recent years, Danish power plants have undergone a change from the use of coal to the use of biomass as an energy source. Today, biomass accounts for just over two-thirds of renewable energy in Denmark. The solid biomass consists mainly of wood chips and wood pellets from trees and wood waste that are cut open. In this connection, we can still talk about burning wood and forests in Denmark, but this is done with a greater insight into and understanding of the mistakes of the past. The burnt wood materials come precisely from sustainable forests, where care is made to offset the carbon footprint from burning with continuous planting of new trees.

New innovative Danish power companies launch green initiatives

In line with the current green transition from non-renewable energy sources to sustainable energy, a number of Danish energy companies have launched several different projects to promote danish nature's CO2 absorption. These electricity companies are not only endeavouring to make their energy production as green as possible, but are also trying to launch climate projects that will go beyond the already existing green measures. One of the power companies is Watts and its members.

Help the world's forests through greener electricity consumption

Watts has as one of the only power companies in Denmark prepared an expanded and more intelligent version of the function 'See my electricity consumption'. With Watt's so-called energy assistant, members will not only have the opportunity to see when electricity consumption is cheapest, but also when green energy from renewable energy sources can be used during the day. This not only creates a comprehensive insight into one's private electricity consumption, but can also create the basis for laying a future electricity consumption that will be able to rely significantly more on sustainable energy from Denmark's many wind turbines in particular.

A forest for my electricity consumption

Even if you make use of innovative initiatives such as Watt's intuitive energy assistant for better green management of electricity consumption, you can never promise 100 percent renewable energy in your electrical outlet. There may be times when the need for electricity is acute and when green consumption cannot be taken into account. On an equal footing with some other climate-conscious companies, Watts has therefore launched afforestation to create additional measures to further reduce members' carbon footprint. The aim is to make members' power consumption more than 100% CO2 neutral by planting trees.

The expansion of the world's forests starts in.... Svinninge

The first sod is literally taken in connection with the green future-proofing of Watts electricity customers. The first trees are planted in Svinninge in West Zealand, where a peace forest will be built, which will be left untouched. The forest is future-proofed in the sense that it has already received the certification protected forest and must therefore not be felled again in 50 years' time. The 60,000 m2 area of Odsherred is to be planted with 24,000 trees. Once all trees have been planted, the trip will be made to new natural areas in Denmark, where the same procedure applies.

plant trees and increase the vegetation and growth rate of the world's forests

Concrete figures on the CO2 absorption of trees and my electricity consumption

The University of Copenhagen has calculated the effect of the future effect of planted trees on members' power consumption. It is estimated that a newly planted forest of 10,000 m2 could absorb 600 tonnes of CO2 over 50 years . Converted, this means that a tree alone will be able to bind up to 150 kg of CO2 each year. It is estimated that 600 kg of CO2 is emitted from the production of an annual power consumption of 4400 kWh in an ordinary Danish family with 2 children . This means that 4 new trees have to be planted each year to cover the family's carbon footprint. At Watts, you can even choose to help plant up to 8 new trees annually. For a Danish family with 2 children, this will mean that in the long term you not only delete your own power consumption carbon footprint, but also actively help to make the rest of the world more CO2-free.

Where can I see my electricity consumption and save energy?

In addition to the already many green initiatives in the energy sector, there are several direct ways to help the climate and the world's forests now and here and in the long term. For it is one thing to use as much green energy as possible and plant trees for increased CO2 absorption, another is simply to save on electricity consumption and energy in general.

In this connection, one can ask the simple question: Is my electricity consumption too high or is my electricity consumption ok in relation to the necessary needs in the household. With Watt's energy assistant, you not only get the opportunity to see when the energy is greenest, you will also be able to get an intelligent insight into your consumption. Based on data from your previous energy consumption, Watts can calculate your expected future consumption, with which you will be able to gain insight into potential energy savings.

See what you pay in electricity price per hour (kWh) with the Watts app. Switch to Watts - and enjoy the benefits.

Innovative measures to ensure green transition and the world's forests in the future

A lot of research is being carried out into various innovative technologies that should further boost the green transition in Denmark and the world. Further development of wind turbines and solar energy must create greater capacity and efficiency, while, for example, the production of stronger and larger batteries must be able to ensure more optimal storage of renewable energy production.

Privately, intuitive smart products are designed that can be intelligently controlled and further streamline green energy consumption in the home. Ideas for better sharing of green surplus energy across nations are being considered, but equally across local communities and neighbours. All to ensure more optimal, efficient and responsible electricity generation and electricity consumption.

As far as the world's forests are concerned, there has also been an increase in awareness of the vital function of trees in the ecosystem. More and more political forces are doing legwork to get the world's forests higher up the political agenda, and more and more members of grassroots movements and organisations are volunteering for the maintenance of the world's forests.

"You can take responsibility for carrying tomorrow's energy together towards a clearly greener future by taking active action here and now at local level"

Various measures have also emerged in recent years to safeguard the world's largest forests. Among other things, in the form of a rainforest certificate for the world's forests. Over 200,000 Danes have already bought a certificate , and they have thus directly contributed to preserving an important piece of the world's life-giving forests.

It is not necessarily human historical energy production that has cut down the world's forests, but it has put them to overtime in its efforts to absorb its emitted CO2. In this context, the modern electricity producer and electricity consumer can hardly be responsible for historical CO2 emissions and to save the world's forests, but responsibility can be taken to jointly carry tomorrow's energy towards a clearly greener future by taking active action here and now at local level. As you can see it is now practiced in various organizations, climate-conscious power companies and with citizens around the country and worldwide.

(i) sustainable.dk/energi/3-skov/
(ii) https://watts.dk/faktaplanttraeer/
(iii) bolius.dk/saa-meget-el-vand-og-varme-bruger-en-gennemsnitsfamilie-279
(iv) verdensskove.org/red-regnskoven

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We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

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We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

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Change power company, support green energy sources and get electricity overview with Watts

Which power company should I choose and who is betting on sustainable energy and providing the greatest electricity overview? Read along and get the answer

A wind turbine is one of the sustainable and renewable energies that Watts uses

A lot has happened in the Danish energy market over the past 20 years.  Major changes in energy production conditions and significant changes in the supply of Danish electricity companies have meant that Danish electricity customers today face far more alternatives than in the past. Choosing an electricity company, thinking about more sustainable energy sources and newer and more innovative ways to access your electricity consumption are just some of the things that the modern Danish electricity consumer of today can decide on. The Danish electricity market has become more customized, and it has thus also become a place where the Danish consumer can have more co-determination than in the past in its impact on the environment as well as its wallet.

Through an active position, Danish electricity consumers today are free to choose their own electricity company and choose how much insight they want in their consumption. New innovative initiatives have shifted the decisions to the individual consumer, and it is therefore now up to the Danish electricity consumer to decide for himself how much responsibility they want to take for the environment and the economy in connection with the choice of electricity company.

Free choice of electricity company since 2003

Not everyone is aware of this. However, the Danish electricity market was liberalised in 2003 and has since then been free of consumers. Previously, danish citizens had no participation in the choice of electricity company, since the electricity company was then given in advance via one's residence. However, the electricity reform in 1999 started to slow the opening up of the electricity market, culminating in a planned total liberalisation from January 2003. From here, the Danish electricity customers would no longer be geographically tied to a local electricity company.

Despite 18 years of free choice of power company, however, there are still a number of Danes who do not take an active position on their choice of power company. Perhaps this is due to a continuing lack of awareness of the great participation, or it may be rooted in the exact opposite: that one has ample insight into the Danish electricity market, and perhaps almost feels taken aback by the many supply of electricity companies that the market is now bidding for.

How cheap are the cheapest power companies?

For the vast majority of Danes who have a moderate insight into the Danish electricity market, the choice of electricity provider has mainly been about one thing: economy. The various Danish electricity providers have struggled to promote themselves as the best power company on the market, and for many of the Danish customers, the best power company has also been synonymous with the cheapest power company. Over the years, several different electricity price comparison sites have also been created online, where you have been able to see who, for example, was the cheapest power company in 2018 or the cheapest power company in 2019. But is it a failed or simplistic way of looking at the many Danish electricity companies today? Because to what extent is there scope for financial savings by switching power companies and are there other and more relevant elements to consider?

The savings are limited to 18% of your electricity bill

For many people, it can be quite a plausible reason to want to change power companies in the effort to find a cheap power company. However, many consumers may go in search of the cheapest power company in the belief that the electricity companies on the Danish market can compete on the entire electricity bill. However, this is by no means the case. Competition in the electricity market limits to a small corner of your electricity bill, which is only about 18%[i]. The other 82% of your electricity bill will be the same regardless of the choice of electricity company, since this part consists of flat-rate taxes and taxes that are independent of the electricity companies concerned.

The last 18% of the bill relates to kWh price and subscription, and it is here that the Danish electricity companies must engage in competition between themselves on price. It is, of course, possible to point to Denmark's cheapest electricity company in this connection, but the difference between the price of the different suppliers will be minimal, because it is precisely naturally limited by the special circumstances of the electricity bill. Also read more about what one kWh costs and how far one kWh goes.

 

A green choice with Denmark's renewable energy sources

For some consumers, however, the small savings in electricity bills are not the main driver of electricity company choice. More and more Danes are looking to greener energy companies, which are in line with the demands of the time for phasing out the CO2-emitting fossil fuels. These electricity companies try to optimise the supply of electricity from renewable energy sources in Denmark by making use of wind energy, solar energy and biomass.

Denmark's energy consumption by renewable energy sources

Since the 1970s, we in Denmark have installed wind turbines and offshore wind turbines for the extraction of sustainable energy. Today, there are over 6000 wind turbines at sea and on land, which are constantly being refined and further developed to optimise green energy production. In addition, sustainable biomass supplies the source of much of the Danish heat, and today accounts for about 63% of Danish renewable energy production (electricity, water and heat). Solar energy, and wind energy in particular, accounts for the remaining 37% of total energy from renewable energy sources. Overall, energy from renewable energy sources accounts for approximately 34% of total Danish energy consumption in Denmark[ii].

If you look completely isolated at the electricity area itself, today we are very well on our way in the green transition in Denmark. Today, 80% of the Danish power comes from renewable energy sources, of which 4% is from solar energy[iii],approximately 47% is from the Danish wind turbines, while the remaining renewable power is generated from biomass.

The green transition is thus well under way, and with the free choice of electricity company, any consumer can now also opt in to greener electricity companies for a more sustainable future.

However, in addition to the obvious climate-conscious electricity companies in Denmark, there is also an opportunity for electricity companies to go a step further in the fight for co2-neutral energy sources and the equalization of carbon footprints in general.

Proactive green power companies with extra climate-conscious measures

The Danish electricity customers not only have the opportunity to opt in to electricity companies with a green profile that emphasizes energy from sustainable and alternative energy sources, they can also handpick specially dedicated power companies that make an extra effort for the climate. Here, the customer will not only get an electricity company that makes an effort to supply as much electricity as possible from the renewable energy sources in Denmark, it will also have an electricity company that strives to make its electricity customers carbon neutral. There are several tangible ways in which this is to be seen, but above all an action is causing a positive stir.

Afforestation to help with CO2 absorption

Some of the additional climate measures taken by some green power companies are the planting of trees and forests. This happens, among other things, at the power company Watts, where a peace forest of 60,000 m2 is planted in connection with the members' electricity consumption. Each electricity customer at Watts plants trees through its consumption, thus offsetting its carbon footprint due to the long-term CO2 absorption from the planted trees. The more people who choose to switch power companies to Watts, the more trees are physically planted on Danish soil.

When a forest is fully planted, new land is created, where you continue planting another forest. And so it continues with carbon footprint mbalancing measures until Denmark hopefully stands in a place where the green transition is total.

Your electricity consumption is 100% certified green power

Denmark's energy sources are still not 100% renewable. There's still some way to go. However, the Danish current has already taken a seven-mile step, since 80% here is made up of energy created by wind, solar and biomass. However, 20% of Denmark's energy sources in electricity are still created from non-renewable energy sources such as oil and coal. This is mixed together with the green energy in the Danish electricity grid, which is why no one can be guaranteed 100% renewable energy when charging smartphones, streaming TV series on the flat screen or baking buns in the oven. A switch to a green electricity company will nevertheless guarantee that your electricity consumption is of 100% renewable energy. But how does this relate?

In Denmark, a leaf scheme has been set up for electricity suppliers, which has been created to ensure that the certified leaf scheme company in question can guarantee a 100% renewable energy consumption for customers. 1 or 2 blades can be allocated in the scheme, but both certifications ensure that the electricity company can prove that the overall power consumption is 100% green. This is done by the electricity company in question buying up electricity from renewable energy sources elsewhere in order to offset its customers' carbon footprint. So even if your green power company in the leaf scheme cannot guarantee that the power in your Danish outlet is 100% CO2-free, this is compensated by the purchase of green certificates that match the consumption in question.

It is thus not only possible to switch to an electricity company that announces a green and climate-conscious line, you can even choose an electricity company in the Danish magazine scheme that ensures that your carbon footprint is constantly offset.

Use our app for electricity consumption to continuously see your electricity consumption.

Choice of power companies with innovative technology for electricity overview and saving

It is possible to make a switch to electricity companies, which not only ensure co2-free electricity consumption, but which also actively create continuous technological advances for the benefit of the environment and economy. This is done mainly through a confumation of electricity consumption and innovative technology that manages to link customer consumption data in a new and intelligent way.

App-by-app overview for increased transparency

One of the largest Achilles tendons at the Danish electricity companies has been the lack of technical resources, which has had to provide customers with sufficient transparency in their electricity consumption. The public company Energinet, which operates under the Ministry of Climate Energy and Utilities, has otherwise potentially been able to create an electricity overview through its huge data hub[iv]. Here, billions of information about the Danish citizens' electricity consumption is collected by the respective electricity companies on the market, which in theory could be transformed into intelligent data for the benefit of consumers.

However, theory has finally become a practice today, as some electricity companies have now managed to collect this data intelligently. In doing so, Watts has bridged the data collected by creating an intuitive app in the form of an energy assistant that can show its members when on the day, which is the most energy from renewable energy sources and when on the day you connect to low price zones.

Instant insights and electric overview with Watts live map

As the first power company in Denmark, Watts will shortly present a technologically refined and optimized version of your electricity overview. With a physical map that can be inserted into your electricity meter at home, your Watts app will not only give you a static insight into your electricity consumption, it can now also make instant readings of your current power consumption in real time. It provides unprecedented transparency and detail in your electricity overview and creates fertile ground for immediate changes in your electricity consumption for the benefit of both the climate and your budget.

You no longer have to settle for retrospectively making retrospective changes based on outdated data where the 'damage' has already been done. With Watt's live map login, you get a unique real-time electricity overview that allows you to control your electricity consumption more than before. Here you can be written upif you want to hear more.

Which power company should I choose and is it easy to switch?

At some energy companies, a telephone call, an email or an announcement via website or app is sufficient when you want to change energy companies. As a tenant, you are also often free to choose your own energy company, unless something specific has been agreed in advance in the lease.

There is usually a binding period in an electricity company, so you must of course clarify whether you are out of that period. In the day of termination, it is often normal to have one month's notice.

Since the liberalisation of the Danish electricity market in 2003, it has not only become more manageable to change energy companies, but it has become just as easier to find an energy company that matches one's requirements for sustainable energy and up-to-date digital ease of use. An active choice of energy company that works proactively for a greener future with ever-increasing sustainable energy measures.

[i] bolius.dk/saadan-skifter-du-elselskab-18535

[ii] kefm.dk/energi-og-raastoffer/energiforsyning/vedvarende-energi

[iii] danskenergi.dk/nyheder/rekordaar-stroemmen-har-aldrig-vaeret-groennere

[iv] energinet.dk/El/DataHub

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Renewable energy

Renewable energy – a term that is one of the great buzzwords of the time, and which over the years has gained more and more on the political agenda. But what does the term actually cover up and why is it important to know about? We'll give you the answer to that.

Distribution of energy sources

Renewable energy: An important key to a greener future

Renewable energy – a term that is one of the great buzzwords of the time, and which over the years has gained more and more on the political agenda. But what does the term actually cover up and why is it important to know about? We'll give you the answer to that.

Green energy, climate-friendly energy, sustainable energy and renewable energy – few are now familiar with one or more of these terms, especially after they have become some of the most important on the green agenda and political agenda, both nationally and globally.

Renewable energy has gradually become an essential technology for reducing the world's CO2 emissions, as the production of power from wind, solar, water and waves can significantly reduce CO2 emissions. Indeed, it is so essential that it is an important key to the solution to keep the global temperature rise below 1.5 degrees.

Thus, back in 2015, 196 member states of the UN Climate Convention entered into a legally binding climate agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions, and around the world there is ongoing work to prioritize the green transition with a focus on saving energy throughout society and getting more renewable energy in the form of more wind turbines, solar panels and more biogas.

Here at home too, renewable energy sources are given priority, and both the government and companies across the country set ongoing targets for the climate and the green transition.

But what is renewable energy really if you have to try to translate it into something a little more tangible? First, let's take a look at the story behind it.

Download the app from Wattsand support the climate using renewable energy sources.

From oil crisis to renewable energy solutions

Back in 1973, the so-called Energy Crisis arose when Arab oil producers chose to soar the prices of oil and stopped oil exports to, among other things, The Hague. Netherlands and usa. They did so partly because western countries had expressed their support for Israel, which was at war with Syria and Egypt at the time – and Arab oil producers did not agree with that support.

As oil prices rose sharply, the same commodity accounted for 90 percent of Denmark's energy consumption, and the Arab countries' boycott therefore hit the country hard with significant price increases for heating oil and gasoline. This meant that the then government introduced a number of temporary laws such as car-free Sunday, a ban on window lighting after hours and speed restrictions across the country.

In the months that followed, danes signed off on saving energy when they got home from work, and studies from that time show that Danes generally got better at cutting energy consumption.

The importance of the crisis for Denmark led, among other things, to the need to think new, be innovative and find greener alternatives to oil, and in the years after 1973 the then government took the first tentative steps towards a greener society by seriously seeking alternative methods to ensure an efficient and safe energy supply based on renewable energies such as wind and solar energy.

Read also: What does a kWh cost

Renewable energy today

Today, renewable energy (climate-friendly energy) is an umbrella term for wind, solar, bioenergy, geothermal and other technologies that are carbon-neutral and therefore distinct from fossil fuels like coal and oil.

The distribution of energy sources in Denmark

According to the Ministry of Climate, Energy and Utilities, renewable energy is a form of energy that is extracted from renewable energy sources and is "eternal" – this means that as long as we live on earth, we will have access to selected forms of energy that are unlimited. At the same time, when we invest in renewable energy, we contribute to reducing fossil fuels such as coal and oil – i.e. reducing our use of resources that are scarce and limited and that are more environmentally damaging to our planet than the green and renewable alternatives.

Climate-friendly energy is used primarily in power generation, transport, district heating and for energy supply in hard-to-reach parts of the country. This means, for example, that you can get hot water with the help of solar energy, or you can choose to buy power from an electricity company that bases its power on renewable energy sources.

In Denmark, wind and bioenergy in particular are the renewable energies we use the most because they are best suited to our climate. Let us briefly present the two concepts:

Wind energy is when you use the wind's energy to make power. Wind turbines are used for this, and Denmark is among the world leaders when it comes to developing, producing and installing them. According to the Danish Energy Agency, Denmark has been installing wind turbines on land since the 1970s, and therefore they have grown both in number and capacity. It is the municipalities that are responsible for planning the installation of new wind turbines on land, but private individuals can also apply for grants to install a wind turbine on their own land.

Bioenergy is the energy stored in organic matter or biomass. Biomass can be burned directly or processed into different kinds of fuels, e.g. wood pellets or biogas. Unlike wind and solar energy, biomass can be stored. In 2018, biomass contributed 15.4 percent to the total electricity supply.

At home, therefore, there are several different forms of renewable energy, all of which are intended to contribute to the green transition by storing energy until it is needed.

 

Renewable energy in Denmark

At home, it is the government's ambition that by 2050 Denmark should be completely independent of fossil fuels – this means that in less than three decades we will be able to produce enough renewable energy to cover the total Danish energy consumption.

A wind turbine, one of Denmark's renewable energy sources

However, there is some way to go if we are to achieve that goal. In Denmark, renewable energy in 2019 covered 35 percent of actual energy consumption across the country – in 2017 the figure was 34.2 percent.

One of the areas where a product has so far been successfully based on more and more renewable energy is in the production of electricity. According to the Danish Energy Agency, the production of electricity based on renewable energy accounted for a whopping 67.5 percent of the total electricity supply in Denmark in 2019 – that is 7 percent more than in 2018.

This increase is primarily due to a significant increase in the production of electricity from wind turbines, where expansion of capacity and better wind conditions have positively affected production. In fact, we have such good wind conditions in Denmark that 37.5 percent of the total Danish electricity supply consisted of wind energy in 2019, making wind energy one of the most widely used forms of renewable energy in Denmark.

The fact that power from renewable energy sources and especially offshore wind has great potential in terms of reducing CO2 emissions both at home and in the rest of the world is something that has the focus of government and the big business companies.

Several consortia have thus joined the fight for a greener Denmark by helping the government achieve ambitious climate goals by, among other things, establishing offshore wind farms or so-called energy islands. An example is the energy island VindØ, which will be located 100 kilometers off the Danish coast in the North Sea, where there are optimal conditions for the production of wind energy, and it will be ready by 2030.

On the island there is also the possibility of other renewable energy solutions such as Power-to-X for storing energy. In short, Power-to-X means turning electricity into something else, such as hydrogen or synthetic gases.

 

 

Renewable energy on the world map

One thing is how we use renewable energy in Denmark, but what does it really look like if we take a look out into the wider world? According to Eurostat, the EU's statistics agency, which regularly checks the statistics of member countries, the use of renewable energy looks quite positive for many countries, which helps to confirm that renewable energy (climate-friendly energy) is a global phenomenon. Below you can see a chart from Eurostat showing just that:

EU countries' distribution of climate-friendly energy

As can be seen in the chart, countries such as Croatia, Estonia and Bulgaria have already achieved their targets for the use of renewable energy by 2020 by 2019, while Belgium, the Netherlands and Ireland are all some way from their goal of making use of more renewable energy. Common to all countries, however, is that renewable energy accounts for a greater or lesser degree of the total share of energy consumption.

However, as the chart also shows, there is a tendency for the Nordic countries' energy consumption in particular to be largely based on renewable and CO2-free energy. Thus, the share of renewable energy in final consumption in the Nordic countries is distributed as follows: Iceland 72 percent, Norway 71 percent, Sweden 54 percent, Finland 41 percent, Denmark 36 percent, Greenland 19 percent, and the Faroe Islands 7.5 percent.

In the Nordic countries, therefore, work is well under way to increase the share of renewable energy in energy consumption, and although Denmark is in the middle of the Nordic countries' work to promote the conversion of green energy for consumption, we are, however, the country that has had the most speed of transition. This is shown by figures from the Nordic Council of Ministers, which in 2020 published the report "State and the Nordic Region", which takes stock of developments in the region on a number of socially important parameters.

Thus, Denmark has increased by 21 percentage points since 2004, when it comes to the share of renewable energy in consumption, and here the production of electricity from renewable energy sources is a primary cause.

Renewable energy at home

Both nationally and globally, it is a priority to come up with more efficient technologies to use carbon-neutral energy for the benefit of our descendants, the environment and the economy.

But how much energy do we actually use at home in everyday life? According to a survey from Statistics Denmark, danes' energy consumption fell in 2019 for the first time since 2014, partly because we use more wind energy and that consumption of coal has decreased.

solar PV connected to smart app

At the same time, figures show that in 2019, renewable energy consumption was at its highest level ever, with 36.8 per cent of total energy production from renewables - a 4.1 per cent increase from 2018.

So there are indications that we are on the right track, but if we are to achieve our ambitious 70 percent target by 2030, we need to become even better at lowering our energy consumption – also in private.

But what can you actually do to help the green transition well on the way? A good place to start is to take a look at your power consumption, as overall it is one of the big culprits in terms of CO2 pollution worldwide.

According to the Danish Energy Agency, an average dancer uses 1,600 kWh of power per year. However, it is possible to cut your electricity consumption down to 1,000 kWh per year, as long as you think and change your habits a little. At Sparenergi, the Danish Energy Agency has prepared a calculatorwhere you can check what your appliance costs in power. Perhaps you will find that you have a device that costs too much in power, compared to how much you actually use it.

You can also produce your own power with a wind turbine or solar panels – these are the most common plants for self-production of renewable and green energy. A wind turbine in the backyard can save big on electricity bills, and it is good for the environment. Solar panels produce green current directly from the sun's light and can be put on the façade of the house, on the roof or on the ground. At home, a grid-connected photovoltaic system with an optimal location can supply 900-5,000 kWh of green energy per year depending on the size.

 

Is your power based on renewable energy?

In order to be even better at saving energy, it is in some cases worthwhile to change power companies. Often there are several electricity suppliers who offer to supply electricity where you live, and thus there are more products to choose from – some at a cheaper price, others for a greener community and some for both.

You can make a difference to both climate and environment through the power you buy. The power in your outlet is the same no matter where you buy your power, as all power generation is continuously mixed together. It is therefore not possible to sort in the electricity that comes, for example, from energy from wind turbines or the electricity that comes from energy from solar panels.

In return, you can buy electricity products from electricity trading companies, which make an effort to promote the green transition. For example, the companies use different systems to create environmental and climate measures, and by becoming a customer of a green company, you can help make a green difference.

 

renewable energy statistics

But how do you learn whether the power company you have in your binoculars markets power that is green or climate friendly? The Consumer Ombudsman has responded to this – here you have created a set of guidelines for when you can market your power as either, and in this connection a labelling scheme has been created with one or two green leaves, which will make it easier for you as a consumer to see if your electricity product is green and contributed to the green transition.

At Watts, we have been awarded a green leaf as our product is 100% based on renewable energy, which comes from Danish wind turbines and photovoltaic plants. However, we are not the only ones on the market offering electricity with green care for the environment - fortunately. Watts is your green electricity supplier.

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Help the world's forests through your electricity consumption

How has human energy consumption affected the earth's climate, and how can my electricity consumption help help the world's forests?

Trees that make up some of the world's forests. Learn more about how you can contribute to the climate with Watts.

Help the world's forests through your electricity consumption

Human extraction of energy through fossil fuels and fuels has drawn major shifts in the climate. Hundreds of years of inappropriate energy production have left the world at a crossroads calling for the immediate transition to energy extraction through renewable energy sources. Hundreds of years of massive CO2 emissions must be remedied and new ideas for renewable energy production are in mind, so that our electricity consumption and other energy consumption are no longer a global burden on the climate.

In the process towards a green transition figures several important factors. Including, among other things: the world's forests and my electricity consumption. But how do the two things relate? What is their common historical context and how can my electricity consumption be transformed from a sinner in global climate accounting to becoming an active player for a greener future with increased climate balance?

Also read about our price of electricity and power at Watts, or download our app to check your electricity consumption.

Black energy has corroded resources and increased the imbalance

Energy production and energy consumption have played a crucial role in the current climate crisis throughout history. Since industrialisation in the 18th century and over the centuries, we have extracted energy from an unsustainable basis in the form of fossil fuels and fuels such as coal and oil. We have corroded the earth's resources inappropriately, with little thought of how much natural storage the earth has been able to provide. Energy extracted from fossil fuels, also called black energy, has been an effective source of energy production and at that time has appeared to be an inexhaustible source of energy consumption in the then explosive development of emerging industrial societies.

Today we have a completely different insight and understanding of the earth's resources and the global climate accounts. Because, in addition to realising that the previously extensive resources are not at all so extensive again, we have learned that the very by-product of the very same energy production has also had its consequences. And they are the ones we are facing today. The huge CO2 emissions from energy production have increased the greenhouse effect, and the earth now more than ever has a harder time getting rid of its heat. A direct consequence of humanity's long-standing use of black energy.

Felling the world's largest forests has made matters worse

CO2 is inextricably linked to the earth's ecosystem. It is a crucial source of life for plants flowers and trees that use the greenhouse gas for its growth, along with the sun's energy and water from the ground. As part of the ecosystem's cycle, plants and trees convert the absorbed CO2 into oxygen, which is then sent back into the ecosystem, thereby providing life-giving oxygen to animals and humans. Without CO2, no plants and trees, and without oxygen, no humans and animals. Everything is inextricably linked and grounded in deep dependence on each other. But if the world's life-giving forests, plants and flowers make sure to convert our CO2 into oxygen in a completely natural and constant process, what is the problem of the increased greenhouse effect?

Read about the sustainable and green forms of energy at Watts.

No chain is stronger than the weakest link

Earth's ecosystem is a rigorous biological accounting consisting of the right amount of components that together form a sustainable orbit. Small or large shifts in one or more of these components cause disturbances in natural processes and create an increased imbalance over time. With the use of black energy, we have corroded the earth's resources and increased CO2, but in the same breath we have made greater inroads into forests and plants.

Over the last 5,000 years, the land has lost over 1.8 billion hectares of the world's forests, and to this day we cut down the equivalent of 3 times Denmark's size of forest area each year . It is mainly the need for the conversion of forest areas into agriculture that has been the cause of felling the world's life-giving forest. Today, the world's forests cover 30% of the earth's land area and are easily the most effective natural remedy for absorbing the earth's CO2.
It is therefore not for nothing that the forests of the planet are often referred to as the lung of the earth, since the job of the world's forests is to respire for the well-being of the planet.
Man has not only increased the carbon footprint over time, but has also removed part of the natural component, which ensures that the carbon footprint is kept down and allows the earth to actually "breathe".

Today, fortunately, there is an increased awareness of the importance of increased forest worship and forest conservation on a global scale and at home in the form of, for example, organizations such as the Danish Forest Association, Growing Trees and The World's Forests in Copenhagen.

Green energy must relieve the world's forests and rebalance

The modern world has long recognised that the old path to energy is not a viable solution for the future. Human reaction must be taken and several levels responded to. Today, modern wind turbine technology and solar panels have taken over large parts of energy production all over the world and especially with Denmark as a pioneer. With increasingly innovative technology, we are now slowly returning to a more sustainable extraction of energy from the earth's renewable energy sources. Sun and wind are CO2-free, literally giving an increased breathing space to the world's forests and plants in the photosynthesis process of absorbing and storing the earth's greenhouse gases.
We still burn wood – but with care and sustainability

In recent years, Danish power plants have undergone a change from the use of coal to the use of biomass as an energy source. Today, biomass accounts for just over two-thirds of renewable energy in Denmark. The solid biomass consists mainly of wood chips and wood pellets from trees and wood waste that are cut open. In this connection, we can still talk about burning wood and forests in Denmark, but this is done with a greater insight into and understanding of the mistakes of the past. The burnt wood materials come precisely from sustainable forests, where care is made to offset the carbon footprint from burning with continuous planting of new trees.

New innovative Danish power companies launch green initiatives

In line with the current green transition from non-renewable energy sources to sustainable energy, a number of Danish energy companies have launched several different projects to promote danish nature's CO2 absorption. These electricity companies are not only endeavouring to make their energy production as green as possible, but are also trying to launch climate projects that will go beyond the already existing green measures. One of the power companies is Watts and its members.

Help the world's forests through greener electricity consumption

Watts has as one of the only power companies in Denmark prepared an expanded and more intelligent version of the function 'See my electricity consumption'. With Watt's so-called energy assistant, members will not only have the opportunity to see when electricity consumption is cheapest, but also when green energy from renewable energy sources can be used during the day. This not only creates a comprehensive insight into one's private electricity consumption, but can also create the basis for laying a future electricity consumption that will be able to rely significantly more on sustainable energy from Denmark's many wind turbines in particular.

A forest for my electricity consumption

Even if you make use of innovative initiatives such as Watt's intuitive energy assistant for better green management of electricity consumption, you can never promise 100 percent renewable energy in your electrical outlet. There may be times when the need for electricity is acute and when green consumption cannot be taken into account. On an equal footing with some other climate-conscious companies, Watts has therefore launched afforestation to create additional measures to further reduce members' carbon footprint. The aim is to make members' power consumption more than 100% CO2 neutral by planting trees.

The expansion of the world's forests starts in.... Svinninge

The first sod is literally taken in connection with the green future-proofing of Watts electricity customers. The first trees are planted in Svinninge in West Zealand, where a peace forest will be built, which will be left untouched. The forest is future-proofed in the sense that it has already received the certification protected forest and must therefore not be felled again in 50 years' time. The 60,000 m2 area of Odsherred is to be planted with 24,000 trees. Once all trees have been planted, the trip will be made to new natural areas in Denmark, where the same procedure applies.

plant trees and increase the vegetation and growth rate of the world's forests

Concrete figures on the CO2 absorption of trees and my electricity consumption

The University of Copenhagen has calculated the effect of the future effect of planted trees on members' power consumption. It is estimated that a newly planted forest of 10,000 m2 could absorb 600 tonnes of CO2 over 50 years . Converted, this means that a tree alone will be able to bind up to 150 kg of CO2 each year. It is estimated that 600 kg of CO2 is emitted from the production of an annual power consumption of 4400 kWh in an ordinary Danish family with 2 children . This means that 4 new trees have to be planted each year to cover the family's carbon footprint. At Watts, you can even choose to help plant up to 8 new trees annually. For a Danish family with 2 children, this will mean that in the long term you not only delete your own power consumption carbon footprint, but also actively help to make the rest of the world more CO2-free.

Where can I see my electricity consumption and save energy?

In addition to the already many green initiatives in the energy sector, there are several direct ways to help the climate and the world's forests now and here and in the long term. For it is one thing to use as much green energy as possible and plant trees for increased CO2 absorption, another is simply to save on electricity consumption and energy in general.

In this connection, one can ask the simple question: Is my electricity consumption too high or is my electricity consumption ok in relation to the necessary needs in the household. With Watt's energy assistant, you not only get the opportunity to see when the energy is greenest, you will also be able to get an intelligent insight into your consumption. Based on data from your previous energy consumption, Watts can calculate your expected future consumption, with which you will be able to gain insight into potential energy savings.

See what you pay in electricity price per hour (kWh) with the Watts app. Switch to Watts - and enjoy the benefits.

Innovative measures to ensure green transition and the world's forests in the future

A lot of research is being carried out into various innovative technologies that should further boost the green transition in Denmark and the world. Further development of wind turbines and solar energy must create greater capacity and efficiency, while, for example, the production of stronger and larger batteries must be able to ensure more optimal storage of renewable energy production.

Privately, intuitive smart products are designed that can be intelligently controlled and further streamline green energy consumption in the home. Ideas for better sharing of green surplus energy across nations are being considered, but equally across local communities and neighbours. All to ensure more optimal, efficient and responsible electricity generation and electricity consumption.

As far as the world's forests are concerned, there has also been an increase in awareness of the vital function of trees in the ecosystem. More and more political forces are doing legwork to get the world's forests higher up the political agenda, and more and more members of grassroots movements and organisations are volunteering for the maintenance of the world's forests.

"You can take responsibility for carrying tomorrow's energy together towards a clearly greener future by taking active action here and now at local level"

Various measures have also emerged in recent years to safeguard the world's largest forests. Among other things, in the form of a rainforest certificate for the world's forests. Over 200,000 Danes have already bought a certificate , and they have thus directly contributed to preserving an important piece of the world's life-giving forests.

It is not necessarily human historical energy production that has cut down the world's forests, but it has put them to overtime in its efforts to absorb its emitted CO2. In this context, the modern electricity producer and electricity consumer can hardly be responsible for historical CO2 emissions and to save the world's forests, but responsibility can be taken to jointly carry tomorrow's energy towards a clearly greener future by taking active action here and now at local level. As you can see it is now practiced in various organizations, climate-conscious power companies and with citizens around the country and worldwide.

(i) sustainable.dk/energi/3-skov/
(ii) https://watts.dk/faktaplanttraeer/
(iii) bolius.dk/saa-meget-el-vand-og-varme-bruger-en-gennemsnitsfamilie-279
(iv) verdensskove.org/red-regnskoven

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Do you have a remotely read meter? Then you can use power with green care

There is both CO2 and money to be saved by following your electricity consumption in Watts – a newly developed version makes it easier to use your electricity consumption with green care, and already now all Danes with a remotely read electricity meter can download the app.

There is good news for all the many who want to reduce their carbon footprint and save on electricity bills. Over the past few years, Danish Energy Network has been working on a solution that allows all electricity consumers in the country to get an overview of their electricity consumption via, for example, Watts.

Now the solution is ready, and this means that as an electricity consumer, you can give Watts consent to retrieve data about your electricity consumption in Energinet's DataHub, regardless of where you get your power:

"With the solution, all the country's electricity consumers can get an overview of their electricity consumption in Watts, even and fit. As a future user of the app, the new solution means that you can constantly keep track of your consumption and see which energy sources produce power for your power outlet here and now and how much CO2 is emitted per kWh", says Per Madsen, Head of Department at Watts A/S.

Will make it easier to think green thoughts

Although the vast majority of Danes are aware of the current climate challenges, it can sometimes be difficult to think about green solutions when everyday life calls. Therefore, Watts is continuously developed so that it is always easy and convenient for the user to keep high with energy consumption:

"With Watts, we would like to engage Danish consumers to make good choices that help promote the green transition. Therefore, we work proactively with the development of the app, and we continuously enter into relevant collaborations where, for example, several types of supply are connected",says Per Madsen.

Easy and simple to access Watts

If you want to consent to Watts being able to keep an eye on your electricity consumption, it can be done easily and simply via NemID. This avoids finding the customer number that has been required in the past for Watts to access your data:

"It can be a bit difficult to find and enter the customer number if you don't have these numbers at hand – on the other hand, it's something else with NemID, so we hope that this opportunity makes it faster and easier to connect to the app", says Per Madsen.

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To give Watts access to track your electricity consumption:

Under the "Add meter" item, select "Energy Grid" and then use your NemID to create a remotely read meter.

If you are asked for an 8-digit web password in the flow at Energinet, please contact your electricity supplier to obtain it.

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