We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

We are working to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

Date 31.03.22

Watts works hard to create transparency in energy consumption

Watts creates ongoing incentives and initiatives to increase the green transition in Danish homes. This is done through innovative technology, advice and a digital platform that constantly pushes the boundaries of how we can optimise, streamline and maximise Danish energy from a more sustainable perspective.

Watts is therefore actively pushing the electrification of Denmark in an effort to phase out as many fossil fuel-powered elements as possible. Electrification on this scale will eventually shift many households' previously fragmented energy consumption onto one single source: the electricity bill.

 

The electrification of Danish homes

Until recently, we have always been used to keeping track of our energy consumption because it has been relatively fragmented. Petrol or diesel for the car, gas or oil for home heating and electricity for the home have all run on three separate bills, which has made it easier to keep track of the different uses. However, this is now changing, and with a speed we have never seen before.

 

The car and home heating on the electricity bill

I 2021 doubled sales of electric cars in Denmark compared to the previous year. And 2022 is expected to be just another record year. Heating in Danish homes is also increasingly electric. The subsidised incentive to replace the highly CO2-emitting gas and oil furnaces with electrically driven heat pumps is helping to further boost electrically driven Denmark.

With the electrification of Danish society, transport, heating and electricity consumption are now increasingly on the same bill. And as things stand, this will actually create less transparency and overview, since the various energy uses cannot yet be separated from each other on the electricity bill.

In other words, it's getting harder to see the wood for the trees in energy terms, but Watts is working hard to deliver a solution in the near future.

See also: get your electricity prices hour by hour in the Watts app.

Disaggregation is the key word

At Watts, Jon Liisberg is prototyping models to split (or disaggregate) users' electricity consumption into smaller sizes. All this to eventually give Watts' users greater insight into and overview of their electricity bills.

Jon Liisberg is on a major detective mission, as there is extensive data processing and analysis behind the development of the models. People still want to be able to track their 'normal' electricity consumption, but that data can gradually drown out a bit when, for example, an electric car is connected to the power consumption in the home. It is therefore a major process to dissect household consumption, for example to work out how much electric car charging makes up of total electricity consumption. However, Jon Liisberg's first tangible tests point in that direction:

  • I have actually just finished a prototype of a model that I have just tested on a household with an electric car. That hits our estimate within about 2 percent.

However, the test is based on fast-charging electric cars that can charge in three phases. Here, consumption is more intense over shorter periods and therefore more readable in the data. It can therefore also be split more clearly from the rest of the consumption. The picture becomes more blurred when estimating consumption of plug-in hybrid cars.

  • Right now, we need a few more and better data sets on households with plug-in hybrid cars. We have some, but we still need 100 percent confirmation on that data. Plug-in hybrids only charge up to 3 kilowatts and over longer periods of time, so there are greater challenges in disaggregating the data.

However, Watts is obtaining additional datasets from pure plug-in hybrid charging, which will provide even more oversight and insight into the process. This will eventually form the basis for even more accurate disaggregation of electricity consumption, including more precise estimates of plug-in hybrid vehicle consumption.

 

Heat consumption also becomes transparent in the long term

It's not just household transport that is being connected to more and more Danes' electricity bills. With the replacement of oil and gas furnaces by electrically driven heat pumps, more and more households are now adding home heating to their electricity bills. But here too, Watts is working hard to finalise models that will provide more transparency.

- I've been working on breaking down heat consumption at a daily level, so I can make an estimate of roughly what goes into heating a household's energy consumption each day. Of course, this is a bit difficult to verify, but we look at factors such as the effect of outside temperature on consumption, and this creates an opportunity to break down the data.

Just as with electric car charging, there is plenty of data to be analysed and interpreted when disaggregating heat consumption. And there are still some unknowns that Jon Liisberg is working hard to clarify before a beta model is ready. But it will be ready, he assures, and in the near future. We'll be following up on that, of course.

Follow us on social media

@Wattsdk

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /var/www/watts.dk/public_html/wp-content/plugins/mtm-instagram-ish/index.php on line 121